Hanging wall scroll - wood on bottom is falling off

First, see General Framing Info or our Step-by-step Asian Artwork Framing Tutorial. Or, you might be looking for How to Care For and Hang Your Wall Scroll.
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MRoberto
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Hanging wall scroll - wood on bottom is falling off

Post by MRoberto » Jan 28, 2008 12:22 pm

Hi, I just received a 5 foot vertical wall scroll that I'm trying to hang up, but that wooden rod at the bottom of the scroll (sorry don't know the correct name) is barely attached to the silk artwork. I'm afraid it will tear off, so I'd like to find out how I can secure the silk/paper more securely to the wood. Thanks a lot.

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Gary
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Post by Gary » Jan 29, 2008 12:51 am

I've never heard of one of our wall scrolls doing this, so this is a first.

Can I have your order number or last name used when ordering so that I can look this up, and see what options I have for you to replace this at our expense?

-Gary.

MRoberto
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Joined: Jan 28, 2008 12:17 pm
Location: salem, MA

Post by MRoberto » Jan 29, 2008 8:36 am

Hi Gary,
I purchased a few dragon scrolls and a tiger scroll from you about a year ago, so that's why I posted on your forum, you know your wall scrolls! I'm not sure where exactly my family purchased the scroll with the problem from, I spent a long time searching the internet for how to fix it and couldn't find anything. Hopefully you can offer some advice, I hate to see a family gift like this go to waste since I can't hang it in its current state. Any suggestions for fixing this would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks alot,
Michael

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Gary
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Post by Gary » Jan 29, 2008 9:42 am

Other than some strategic placement of tape to hold the thing together, there is not much else you can do. If it's actually unwrapping from the roller, some double-sided tape may help as you put it back together, then a piece of regular scotch tape on the outside (hopefully on the bottom or back side so it doesn't show) to seal it.

Feel free to shoot me a digital picture of the wall scroll. If it's one of mine, I'll repair or replace it for free. We've built and sold about 10,000 wall scrolls in the last six years, and I personally inspected virtually every one of them - Oddly, when I see one of mine, I remember it immediately (not like remembering one of your own children, but more like remembering a long lost girl friend from high school when you pass her on the street).

Otherwise, I might be able to help you with remounting if it's not one of ours. Depending one what is needed, this can range from $20 to $50 for the remounting to a new wall scroll (plus international shipping costs). A picture of the scroll will also help me to determine what the cost would be.

Another option worth considering, is to cut the top and bottom off the scroll, and have it framed. When you cut the top and bottom off, leave enough of the silk to create a border. This will act as your matting for the frame. Effectively, your scroll can become a portrait with a nice silk border, suitable for framing.

Framing is not cheap, but lasts forever, and makes a nice presentation, so carefully consider your options.

Good luck!

-Gary.

PS: This forum will allow you to upload an image attachment if you want to follow up on this.

MRoberto
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Joined: Jan 28, 2008 12:17 pm
Location: salem, MA

Post by MRoberto » Jan 29, 2008 1:18 pm

Here's a photo of the wall scroll. Not sure if it will be easily identified as one of yours since its only calligraphy. If you could let me know a ballpark price range to get it fixed from your shop (in China I assume), that would be great also.

Something else I'm curious about, I've noticed a lot scrolls with that red ink stamp. Is that the artists signature, or some way of identifying where the scroll came from?

Thanks again for all the help.
Mike
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Gary
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Post by Gary » Jan 31, 2008 12:42 am

This is not one of mine. We've never used that color of silk, and I've never worked with this calligrapher.

I can remount this to an all new scroll, but the fact that is has to be unmounted first really makes it labor-intensive. It's about $40 for the job itself, and $15.80 for return shipping from China. This will take about 2 months for round trip transport, and the actual work.

I could make an all new wall scroll, with the same characters (written by my regular calligrapher) in your choice of paper and silk colors for as little as $59.88 - so it's not that much more to go all new. Delivery in about 3 weeks (once the Chinese New Years Holiday is over).

About Red Chops/Stamps/Seals
As far as red chop marks (red stamps), the general rule-of-thumb is as follows:
The red chop below the Chinese inscription and signature is the artist's signature seal. These sort of acts to authenticate the artwork. In ancient times, these seals were used to sign documents and contracts, or anything important. It kind of acts as a self-notary for whatever was stamped. The king's court officers would often hold papers (or bamboo slips) with a stamp applied from the original seal of another king. Then when a document was sent from one king to another, it could be verified that it was really from the other king (almost like a thumb print).

Elsewhere on artwork, you may see other red stamps. Often these are more round or oblong shaped (there is no rule, they can be square too). These are personal stamps used by the artist to add balance to the artwork, or for other personal reasons. Sometimes an artist when an artist wants to preserve a certain amount of white space or a margin, he/she will even place a stamp in a corner to keep the mounter from cropping the artwork too much when it's mounted to a wall scroll.

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