framing scrolls

First, see General Framing Info or our Step-by-step Asian Artwork Framing Tutorial. Or, you might be looking for How to Care For and Hang Your Wall Scroll.
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Customer
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framing scrolls

Post by Customer » Jun 6, 2008 3:11 pm

hi Gary,

i am interested in a couple of your scrolls although i would prefer them if they were not mounted on scrolls but regular framing instead.

can this be done and will i have to pay more?

thanks
su

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Gary
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Location: San Diego / Beijing

Post by Gary » Jun 6, 2008 3:21 pm

Here's what you can do:

Buy the scrolls that you like. Take them to your framer, and just have him/her cut off the top frame and bottom roller (or just do it yourself). In effect, this makes the scroll into a portrait mount. You can trim down the silk at the top and bottom to match the sides (or perhaps leave a little extra, which is a common Asian style) and you have a lovely border around the whole thing (which will save you some money when framing, as you won't be paying for mat board, and for someone to cut the matting. Then have it framed, per your personal preference.

Look for coupons for Aaron Bros, or Michaels for framing specials (if you are in the USA or Canada). Although, I think a private/smaller framer will give you better customer service and personal attention.


Cheers,
-Gary.

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Gary
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Post by Gary » Jun 7, 2008 5:37 pm

Clearly, framed artwork affords more protection than a wall scroll. This is especially true in terms of dust accumulation. If you pay for expensive U.V. protective glazing, you may get even more longevity from the artwork.

Of course, framing costs about 4 times more than scroll mounting. If you buy a $50 scroll from us, almost half of that price represents the scroll mounting labor and materials. When you frame that scroll (after cutting the top and bottom off, as discussed earlier), you'll probably spend $100+ at the frame shop. So greater longevity and more protection comes with a greater cost.

I like scrolls because everyone can afford them, they are traditional, and no framing is required to properly display them (just buy a nail or hook).

Here are the enemies of wall scrolls:
  • Direct sunlight
  • Dust (dust is acidic)
  • Extreme humidity, or variable humidity (extreme humidity yields mold or foxing, and variable humidity yields a wavy or curved scroll)
  • Pets and children
  • Dropping the roller, instead of guiding it down with your hand, when unrolling/hanging.[/list:u]
    Cheers,
    -Gary.

Customer
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Posts: 104
Joined: Nov 3, 2007 9:23 pm

Post by Customer » Jun 7, 2008 5:52 pm

Thanks Gary.

i actually like the look of scrolls but i do worry if they can withstand heat and humid weather conditions without the frame and glass.

then again - i also notice that with my framed pictures can get mouldy after a few years.

would you have any tips or personal experience to share?

thanks
su

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